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Hydrogen cell comes to area

Friday, October 17, 2008

(Photo)
Judy Flemming is holding the hydrogen cell, it is no larger than a coffee can and can increase gas mileage from 10 to 40 percent. The hydrogen cell can be purchased and installed at the Service Station in Hardy. Photo/Amanda Powers
It may look like a simple canister but it can keep money in your pocket and pollution out of the air.

Roger Seratt, owner of Fairdealing Hydrogen Cell Company, has developed a new hydrogen cell that he guarantees will increase fuel mileage up to 40 percent. "If you don't see an increase of 10 to 40 percent in your gas mileage we will refund 100 percent of what you paid for the item," Seratt pledges.

Seratt has a long list of credentials in the fuel industry, starting 33 years ago. In 1975, he was involved in the design, construction and operation of three pilot biodiesel oil refineries and two A.T.F licensed alcohol fuel distilleries in Arkansas.

Since his beginning in the fuel industry Seratt has worked as an instructor, lecturer and seminar speaker at biofuel functions for colleges, work shops and private government sponsored events across the United States and Canada. Serrat was also involved in the design, manufacture and sale of America's first duel fuel, straight alcohol/gasoline automotive conversion system.

Among many other accomplishments, Seratt can now add the "See-Through" hydrogen fuel cell. This small canister-like cell is the technology that allows a water-burning hybrid. The hydrogen cell kit simply hooks up to any vehicle without any modification required.

Seratt tested his product on several vehicles including his own and is now beginning to sell and market it. The Service Station on Main Street in Hardy is the first location to sell and install Seratt's invention. Rocky McCollum, owner of the Service Station, had a hydrogen cell installed on his vehicle.

The unit only requires 12 volts of DC power, which is less than the heater in an average vehicle uses. The power is only drawn from the battery when the vehicle's ignition switch is on. The cell is filled with a mixture of baking soda and water that lasts between two and four tanks of gas depending on the size of the vehicle.

The gas produced from the hydrogen, oxygen mixture is drawn into the vehicle intake system as it is produced and is burned by the engine with the gasoline. The hydrogen gas causes the vehicle to burn the gasoline it uses more efficiently and replaces part of the gasoline needed to power the vehicle.

The end result of the system is a quieter, smoother running car, reduced emissions and huge savings. "The hydrogen unit does not take away from the car's power or torque, it actually adds to it," Seratt said.

The unit can be purchased directly from Fairdealing Hydrogen Cell Company with instructions for self-instalation or from the Service Station in Hardy. The Service Station installs the units for $400 with a one year guarantee on the entire unit.

"If there are any companies, especially municipalities, with several cars, we will install one hydrogen cell for free," Seratt said. "If they see the difference they can purchase additional units for other vehicles."

"We are still working on the hydrogen cell unit for diesel powered vehicles, but it is underway," Seratt said.


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I think this is a great idea. I hope the cell is patented in the U.S. and MADE in the U.S. We need things made in the U.S. to provide jobs here and help the local economies.

-- Posted by mozarkann on Mon, Oct 20, 2008, at 6:43 PM


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