[Nameplate] Fair ~ 76°F  
High: 77°F ~ Low: 61°F
Friday, May 6, 2016

Election time in Missouri

Friday, October 29, 2010

(Photo)
On Tuesday, Nov. 2, Missouri voters will have three proposed Constitutional amendments to vote on plus two Propositions, along with electing city, county and state officials in Oregon County.

Constitutional Amendment 1 reads: Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended to require the office of county assessor to be an elected position in all counties with a charter form of government, except counties with a population between 600,001-699,999?

A "yes" vote will amend the Missouri Constitution to require that assessors in charter counties be elected officers. This proposal will affect St. Louis County and any county that adopts a charter form of government. The exception is for a county that has between 600,001-699,999 residents, which currently is only Jackson County.

A "no" vote will not change the current requirement for charter counties.

If passed, this measure will not have an impact on taxes.

Constitutional Amendment 2 reads: Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended to require that all real property used as a homestead by Missouri citizens who are former prisoners of war and have a total service-connected disability be exempt from property taxes?

The number of qualified former prisoners of war and the amount of each exemption are unknown; however, because the number who meet the qualifications is expected to be small, the cost to local governmental entities should be minimal. Revenue to the state blind pension fund may be reduced by $1,200.

A "yes" vote will amend the Missouri Constitution to exempt from property taxes all real property used as a homestead by any Missouri citizen who is a former prisoner of war with a total service-connected disability.

A "no" vote will not add this exemption to the Missouri Constitution.

If passed, this measure will decrease property taxes for qualified citizens.

Constitutional Amendment 3 reads: Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended to prevent the state, counties, and other political subdivisions from imposing any new tax, including a sales tax, on the sale or transfer of homes or any other real estate?

A "yes" vote will amend the Missouri Constitution to prevent the state, counties, and other political subdivisions from imposing any new tax, including a sales tax, on the sale or transfer of homes or any other real estate.

A "no" vote will not change the Missouri Constitution to prevent the state, counties, and other political subdivisions from imposing a new tax on the sale or transfer of homes or any other real estate.

If passed, this measure will have no impact on taxes.

Next up are the two Propositions, A and B. Proposition A reads: Shall Missouri law be amended to:

* repeal the authority of certain cities to use earnings taxes to fund their budgets;

* require voters in cities that currently have an earnings tax to approve continuation of such tax at the next general municipal election and at an election held every 5 years thereafter;

* require any current earnings tax that is not approved by the voters to be phased out over a period of 10 years; and

* prohibit any city from adding a new earnings tax to fund their budget?

The proposal could eliminate certain city earnings taxes. For 2010, Kansas City and the city of St. Louis budgeted earnings tax revenue of $199.2 million and $141.2 million, respectively. Reduced earnings tax deductions could increase state revenues by $4.8 million. The total cost or savings to state and local governmental entities is unknown.

A "yes" vote will amend Missouri law to repeal the authority of certain cities to use earnings taxes to fund their budgets. The amendment further requires voters in cities that currently have an earnings tax, St. Louis and Kansas City, to approve continuation of such tax at the next general municipal election and at an election held every five years or to phase out the tax over a period of ten years.

A "no" vote will not change the current Missouri law regarding earnings taxes.

If passed, this measure will impact taxes by removing the ability of cities to fund their budgets through earnings taxes. The only exception is that voters in cities that currently have an earnings tax may vote to continue such taxes.

Proposition B reads: Shall Missouri law be amended to:

* require large-scale dog breeding operations to provide each dog under their care with sufficient food, clean water, housing and space; necessary veterinary care; regular exercise and adequate rest between breeding cycles;

* prohibit any breeder from having more than 50 breeding dogs for the purpose of selling their puppies as pets; and

* create a misdemeanor crime of "puppy mill cruelty" for any violations?

It is estimated state governmental entities will incur costs of $654,768 (on-going costs of $521,356 and one-time costs of $133,412). Some local governmental entities may experience costs related to enforcement activities and savings related to reduced animal care activities.

A "yes" vote will amend Missouri law to require large-scale dog breeding operations to provide each dog under their care with sufficient food, clean water, housing and space; necessary veterinary care; regular exercise and adequate rest between breeding cycles. The amendment further prohibits any breeder from having more than 50 breeding dogs for the purpose of selling their puppies as pets. The amendment also creates a misdemeanor crime of "puppy mill cruelty" for any violations.

A "no" vote will not change the current Missouri law regarding dog breeders.

If passed, this measure will have no impact on taxes.

Moving on to County races, for Presiding Commissioner, Democrat Leo Warren will be facing off against Republican Patrick Ledgerwood.

For Oregon County Clerk, incumbent Democrat Tracy Bridges will be running against Republican David Stubblefield.

For Collector of Revenue, incumbent Democrat Jerry Richardson will be facing off against Republican Dale Adrian.

Running in unopposed county races are: Republican Harvey Allen for Associate Circuit Judge, Democrat Ronda Hall for Clerk of the Circuit Court, Democrat April (Blankenship) Bridges for Recorder of Deeds, Democrat Kim S. Hollis for Treasurer, and Democrat Fred O'Neill for Prosecuting Attorney.

In the hotly contested race for District 153 State Representative, a seat being vacated by the term-limited Mike Dethrow, three candidates are vying for the vote: Democrat George Meyers, Republican Steve Cookson and the Constitution Party's candidate, Rory Calhoun.

For U. S. Representative District 8, there are four candidates competing for the post: Democrat Tommy Sowers, Republican Jo Ann Emerson, Libertarian candidate Rick Vandeven and Independent candidate Larry Bill.

For State Auditor, Democrat Susan Montee is up against Republican Tom Welch and Libertarian candidate Charles W. Baum.

The big race of the night will be the contest for the U.S. Senate Seat. Four candidates have been on the campaign trail, vying for this post. They are: Democrat Robin Carnahan, Republican Roy Blunt, Libertarian candidate Johnathan Dine and Constitution Party candidate Jerry Beck.

Voters will also be asked to decide if the following judges should be retained for another term in office: Missouri Supreme Court Judge -- Zel Fischer; Missouri Court of Appeals Judges, Southern District -- Bob Barney and Don E. Burrell.

Polls will be open on Nov. 2 from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Additional information about voter registration and polling places can be found at the Missouri Secretary of State Web site online at www.sos.mo.gov/elections.



Respond to this story

Posting a comment requires free registration: